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FY19 Panelist Information and Application

FY19 Panelist Information and Application

The FY19 Deadline: Monday, April 16, 2018 

Click here to download the FY19 Panelist Guidelines.

Click here to complete the FY19 Panelist Application.

*Please email your resume to Kia Jackson-Rogers – [email protected]

Office of Cultural Affairs Logos

2018-2019 Grade Level Experiences

Pre-K Children’s Museum

Kindergarten Atlanta Botanical Garden

1st Grade Ballethnic Dance Company

2nd Grade Atlanta Ballet

3rd Grade Chattahoochee Nature Center

4th Grade Atlanta History Center

5th Grade Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum

6th Grade Alliance Theatre

7th Grade Arts Bridge

8th Grade National Center for Civil and Human Rights

High School 1 APEX Museum

High School 2 Atlanta Opera

High School 3 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra

High School 4 College Football Hall of Fame

High School 5 David J. Sencer CDC Museum

High School 6  Georgia Aquarium

High School 7  Giwayen Mata

High School 8 High Museum

High School 9 Historical Oakland Cemetery

High School 10 Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA)

High School 11 Chick-fil-A Backstage Tour

High School 12  Rialto Center for the Arts

High School 13 Theatrical Outfit

High School 14 The King Center

High School 145 True Colors Theatre Company

High School 16 ZuCot Gallery

2018-2019 Study Guide and Materials

Pre-K
  1. Study Guide – Children’s Museum
  2. Things to Know, Before You Go – Children’s Museum

 

Kindergarten
  1. Study Guide – Atlanta Botanical Gardens
  2. Things To Know, Before You Go – Atlanta Botanical Gardens

 

1st Grade
  1. Study Guide – Ballethnic Dance Company at Morehouse
  2. Things To Know, Before You Go – Ballethnic Dance Company at Morehouse

 

2nd Grade
  1. Study Guide – Atlanta Ballet
  2. Things To Know, Before You Go – Atlanta Ballet

 

3rd Grade
  1. Study Guide – Chattahoochee Nature Center
  2. Things To Know, Before You Go – Chattahoochee Nature Center

 

4th Grade
  1. Study Guide for the Atlanta History Center – includes the following:
    1. The Slaves Dream Poem
    2. Emancipation Proclamation Pre-Visit
    3. Student Quiz
  2. Things To Know Before You Go – Atlanta History Center

 

5th Grade
  1. Study Guide – Jimmy Carter Presidential Library
  2. Things To Know, Before You Go – Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum

 

6th Grade
  1. Study Guide/Things to Know – Alliance Theatre

 

7th Grade
  1. Study Guide/Things to Know – ArtsBridge

 

8th Grade
  1. Study Guide – National Center for Civil and Human Rights
  2. Things To Know, Before You Go – National Center for Civil and Human Rights

 

High School Trips

Apex Museum
  1. Study Guide – Apex Museum
  2. Stories and Lessons They Teach
  3. Things To Know, Before You Go – Apex Museum

 

Atlanta Opera
  1. Study Guide/ Things to Know – Atlanta Opera
Atlanta Symphony Orchestra
  1. Study Guide – Atlanta Symphony Orchestra
  2. Things to Know, Before You Go – Atlanta Symphony Orchestra
Chick-fil-A Backstage Tour
  1. Study Guide – Chick-fil-A Backstage Tour
  2. Things To Know, Before You Go – Chick-fil-A Backstage Tour
College Football Hall of Fame
  1. Study Guide – College Football Hall of Fame
  2. Things To Know, Before You Go – College Football Hall of Fame

 

Michael C. Carlos  Emory University
  1. Study Guide –  Michael C. Carlos Museum
  2. Things To Know, Before You Go – Michael C. Carlos Emory University

 

Georgia Aquarium
  1. Teacher Guide – Georgia Aquarium
  2. Student Guide – Georgia Aquarium
  3. Things To Know, Before You Go – Georgia Aquarium

 

Giwayen Mata

Giwayen Mata Study Guide
Things to Know Before You Go

High Museum
      1. Study Guide – High Museum
      2. Things To Know, Before You Go – High Museum

 

Historic Oakland Cemetery
      1. Study Guide – High Museum – Historic Oakland Cemetery
      2. Things To Know, Before You Go – Historic Oakland Cemetery

 

Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA)
      1. Study Guide – High Museum – Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA)
      2. Things To Know Before You Go– Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA)

 

Rialto Center for the Arts
                  1. Study Guide – Rialto Center for the Arts
                  2. Things To Know, Before You Go – Rialto Center for the Arts

 

Theatrical Outfit
                  1. Study Guide – Theatrical Outfit
                  2. Things To Know, Before You Go – Theatrical Outfit

 

The King Center
                  1. Pre-Visit Assignment – The King Center
                  2. Things To Know, Before You Go – The King Center

 

True Colors Theatre Company
                  1. Study Guide – True Colors Theatre Company
                  2. Things To Know, Before You Go – True Colors Theatre Company

 

ZuCot Gallery
                  1. Study Guide – ZuCot Gallery
                  2. Things To Know, Before You Go – ZuCot Gallery

 

Journey to Freedom

In 2015, The Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs (OCA) was the recipient of an “Imagine Your Parks” grant, a joint program between the National Park Service and the National Endowment for the Arts that honors and protects America’s national and cultural treasures.

The “Journey to Freedom” public art project Journey to Freedom: Women of the Civil Rights by Lynn Marshall Linnemeier incorporates photographs from Dr. Doris A. Derby, Shelia Turner and Susan Ross, and celebrates the contribution of women to the Civil Rights Movement past and present. The project seeks to honor the mothers, sisters and daughters of the movement by visually bridging the gap between generations and focusing on the continued commitment to social justice. The project uses wall murals and figurative silhouettes to honor both women in Atlanta, Georgia and the greater region of the south through a variety of photographs and symbolic motifs, including quilt styled designs.

The Freedom Park Pathway Mural Project will carry out the mission of the “Imagine Your Parks” program by creating a new experience to commemorate civil rights heroines in Atlanta, and our nation’s heritage.

Download the dedication program here

1. Jean Childs Young was the first lady of Atlanta during the mayoral terms of her husband, Andrew Young, in the 1980s and was known nationally and internationally as an educator and advocate for children’s rights. Young devoted much of her life to teaching and to promoting the benefits of education, especially literacy. She founded the Mayor’s Task Force on Public Education, which created several programs such as the Dream Jamboree and the Mayor’s Scholar Program. In Atlanta Young co-founded with Lucy Vance the Atlanta/Fulton Commission on Children and Youth, which sponsored the program “Kids 4 a Change.” She also served on the boards of several national and state organizations devoted to the well-being of children, including the Children’s Defense Fund and UNICEF.

 

 

2. Septima Poinsette Clark was an American educator and civil rights activist. Clark developed the literacy and citizenship workshops that played an important role in the drive for voting rights and civil rights for African Americans in the American Civil Rights Movement.  Septima Clark’s work was commonly under-appreciated by Southern male activists. She became known as the “Queen mother” or “Grandmother” of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States. Martin Luther King, Jr. commonly referred to Clark as “The Mother of the Movement.” Clark’s argument for her position in the Civil Rights Movement was one that claimed “knowledge could empower marginalized groups in ways that formal legal equality couldn’t.”

 

 

5. Fannie Lou Hamer was a civil rights activist who helped African Americans register to vote and who co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Hamer dedicated her life to the fight for civil rights, working for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. This organization was comprised mostly of African-American students who engaged in acts of civil disobedience to fight racial segregation and injustice in the South. Along with her political activism, Hamer worked to help the poor and families in need in her Mississippi community. She also set up organizations to increase business opportunities for minorities and to provide childcare and other family services. She helped establish the National Women’s Political Caucus in 1971.

 

 

 

6. Constance Curry is an author and civil rights activist. From 1960-1964 she was Director of the Southern Student Human Relations Project of the National Student Association and became the first white female on the executive committee of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). From 1964-1975, she was Southern Field Representative of the American Friends Service Committee. In 1975, she became Director of the Office of Human Services for the City of Atlanta. Her book, Silver Rights, won the 1996 Lillian Smith Award for non-fiction and recounts the story of one rural Mississippi family’s struggle for education and for civil rights during the 1960s.

 

 

 

7. Charlayne Hunter-Gault holds a place in Georgia civil rights history as one of the first two African American students admitted to the University of Georgia. Also known for her career as an award-winning journalist, Hunter-Gault is respected for her work on television and in print. Hunter graduated from UGA in 1963 and accepted her first job as an editorial assistant at the New Yorker. After advancing to the position of staff writer, she left the magazine to accept a Russell Sage Fellowship for one year, then worked as a reporter and evening anchor for WRC-TV in Washington, D.C., for another year. Hunter returned to print journalism in 1968, joining the metropolitan staff of the New York Times and establishing the newspaper’s Harlem bureau. In the 90’s Hunter-Gault moved to South Africa to be with her husband and became the chief correspondent in Africa for National Public Radio and later, for CNN.

 

 

8. Alice Walker is an internationally celebrated writer, poet and activist whose books include seven novels, four collections of short stories, four children’s books, and volumes of essays and poetry. She won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1983 and the National Book Award. Her work has been translated into more than two dozen languages, and along with the Pulitzer Price and the National Book Award, Walker was honored as one of the inaugural inductees into the California Hall of Fame. In 2007, her archives were opened to the public at Emory University in her birth state of Georgia.

 

 

 

 

9. Kathleen Cleaver is a senior lecturer and research fellow at Emory University School of Law who has spent her life participating in the human rights struggle. In 1966, Kathleen Neal dropped out of Barnard College in New York to join the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) where she served in its Campus Program based in Atlanta. She then moved to the San Francisco Bay Area and from 1967 to 1971, she was the first Communications Secretary of the Black Panther Party. After sharing years of exile, in Algeria and France with former husband Eldridge Cleaver, she returned with her family to the United States in late 1975. At Emory, Cleaver has taught pre-trial litigation, professional ethics, torts, and legal history. Her current scholarship and teaching is focused on the U.S. law of citizenship and race. In 1993, she served on the Georgia Supreme Court Commission on Racial and Ethnic Bias in the Courts, and became a board member of the Southern Center for Human Rights.

 

10. Iya Fulani Sunni-Ali was a civil rights activist with the Black Panther Party, as well as a citizen of the Provisional Government of the Republic of New Africa (PGRNA), which has historically sought to create a black nation in the five southern states of Mississippi, Georgia, Louisiana, Alabama and Florida.As a Party member, she not only sang with Miriam Makeba, a South African female singer, but she also protected Stokely Carmichael, one of the Black Panther Party leaders. For four years, she and Makeba performed professionally as singers around the world. She eventually became involved in developing and teaching as a volunteer instructor and taught courses on black history.

 

 

11. Dorothy Cotton was the Education Director for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. In that capacity, she worked closely with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and other civil rights leaders, directing the Citizenship Education Program. She later served as the Vice President for Field Operations for the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta, where she was a leader and senior trainer for the Center in areas of nonviolence and empowerment for leadership. Under the Carter Administration, she served as the Southeastern Regional Director of ACTION, the Federal Government’s agency for volunteer programs.

 

 

12. Nikki Giovanni is currently University Distinguished Professor at Virginia Tech, where she has taught since 1987. In 1960, she entered Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, where she worked with the school’s Writer’s Workshop and edited the literary magazine. After receiving her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1967, she organized the Black Arts Festival in Cincinnati before entering graduate school at the University of Pennsylvania and Columbia University. Giovanni is the author of numerous children books and poetry collections in which she reflects on the African-American identity. She was the first recipient of the Rosa Parks Woman of Courage Award. She has served as poetry judge for the National Book Awards and was a finalist for a Grammy Award in the category of Spoken Word.

15. Dorothy Height was a civil rights and women’s rights activist focused primarily on improving the circumstances of and opportunities for African-American women. Height was a leader in addressing the rights of both women and African Americans as the president of the National Council of Negro Women. In the 1990s, she drew young people into her cause in the war against drugs, illiteracy and unemployment. The numerous honors bestowed upon her include the Presidential Medal of Freedom (1994) and the Congressional Gold Medal (2004).

 

16. June Johnson was one of the tide of young people–a mid-twentieth century generational shift–who emerged into civil rights activism and leadership.Johnson first heard about the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Council from a flyer given to her at a local church, and she snuck tovoter registration workshops in the evenings while her parents were at work. Johnson went on to organize both the Greenwood Voters’ League and worked with the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and Council of Federated Organizations. After she left SNCC staff, she worked as a paralegal and helped sue Greenwood and Leflore County for its racist practices. She served as the first Vice President for the Office of Early Childhood Development in Jackson and continued to assist numerous organizations for equality, both in Mississippi and in Washington, D.C., where she lived for several years.

 

 

17. Margaret Kargbo was a young arts professional and community activist whose life was claimed by a tragic car accident in 2015. Kargbo studied marketing at Howard University in Washington, DC before moving to Atlanta. She was involved in a number of social programs and worked with numerous organizations over the years. From 2007 to 2011, she did public relations for the National Black Arts Festival and was the public affairs director of the nonprofit Women Engaged when she passed. She was also working on the project Wheel 2 Live, the board chair at C4, a founding member of The Ladies Board, on the selection committee of Idea Capital and an active volunteer with BURNAWAY.

ELEVATE: Summer

ELEVATE: Summer

Friday, July 22, 2016

On July 22nd, 2016 the City of Atlanta- Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs introduced a new ELEVATE event called ELEVATE: Summer. This new event was the beginning of making ELEVATE a year-round public art experience with seasonal programming. ELEVATE: Summer took place on Broad St. SW from 3:00-11:00pm. This one day event featured performance art, dance, music, public art installations by nearby arts organizations, an artist market, and food trucks. The purpose of ELEVATE: Summer was to bring attention to the performing arts of Atlanta and the state of Georgia while also showcasing the arts organizations that have created an arts district in the Broad St. SW area. Atlanta artist and long-time contributor to the arts, Priscilla Smith, was the emcee for the day.

During ELEVATE: Summer event, the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs announced its plans for the sixth annual ELEVATE public art festival, to occur later this year in October. The week-long ELEVATE public art festival will take place from October 13-21, 2016 along Broad Street SW in South Downtown. Included in this announcement was the unveiling of the ELEVATE curatorial team—comprised of Allie Bashuk, Monica Campana, Pastiche Lumumba and Mark DiNatale. This diverse curatorial team will help bring unique public art experiences through the festival theme “Microcosm.”

ELEVATE: Summer Programming:

For ELEVATE: Summer the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs (OCA) partnered with Poetry Slam Inc. to bring Georgia poetry slam groups Java Monkey, Just N Thyme, Fountain City and Art Amok to the event. Additionally, OCA curated an artist market and commissioned the 5 arts organizations  (i.e. Mammal Gallery, Eyedrum Art & Music Gallery, Downtown Player’s Club, Murmur, and Broad Street Visitors Center) in South Downtown to create art installations for ELEVATE: Summer.

Fountain City Slam Poets

Fountain City Slam Poets

Artistic Director of the Natya Dhaara Performing Arts Center, Uma Palam Pulendran

Artistic Director of the Natya Dhaara Performing Arts Center, Uma Palam Pulendran

Ajmal " Mas Man" Millar's performance "We Are One"

Ajmal ” Mas Man” Millar’s performance “We Are One”

Mausiki Scales & the Common Ground Collective

Mausiki Scales & the Common Ground Collective

BOSCO and Speakerfoxxx

BOSCO and Speakerfoxxx

Brandon English's Black Lives Matter Photography Exhibit at Broad Street Visitors Center

Brandon English’s Black Lives Matter Photography Exhibit at Broad Street Visitors Center

Dream Collection Agency takes over Downtown Player's Club

Dream Collection Agency takes over Downtown Player’s Club

Precarious Bodies exhibition at Murmur

Precarious Bodies exhibition at Murmur

ELEVATE summer launch party web resolution files

William Kennedy’s 32 CRT TV wall installation in the entrance of Mammal Gallery.

Summer 8

Art On The Wall artist painting live

 

Mural Bike Rack Project

 

 

The Mural Bike Rack project is the newest addition to the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs Public Art Services programming. The goal of the Mural Bike Rack Program is to bring attention to biking transportation and biking infrastructure through creative place-making and public art. The project provided the opportunity for 18 local artists (see list below) to design and paint locally crafted bike-shaped racks. The bike racks have been installed at 18 different locations around the City of Atlanta’s center.

Follow our Facebook and Instagram (@publicartatlanta)  for more images and updates of the Mural Bike Racks!

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1/18 of the Mural Bike Racks. Bike rack was painted by Artist Terri Dilling, and is located in Inman Park on North Highland Ave.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016-2017 Grade Level Experiences

 

Pre-K Children’s Museum

Kindergarten Atlanta Botanical Garden

1st Grade Ballethnic Dance Company

2nd Grade Atlanta Ballet

3rd Grade Chattahoochee Nature Center

4th Grade Atlanta Symphony Orchestra

5th Grade High Museum of Art

6th Grade Alliance Theatre

7th Grade Arts Bridge

8th Grade Atlanta History Center

High School 1 Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum

High School 2 Atlanta Shakespeare Company

High School 3 National Center for Civil and Human Rights

High School 4 ZuCot Gallery

High School 5 True Colors Theatre Company

High School 6 David J. Sencer CDC Museum

High School 7 Theatrical Outfit

High School 8 The Atlanta Opera

High School 9 Museum of Design Atlanta

High School 10 College Football Hall of Fame

High School 11 Oakland Cemetery

High School 12 France-Atlanta with Cartooning For Peace

Paul Stephen Benjamin: Come Over

February 25th – April 7th, 2016

“Come Over,” an exhibition by award winning artist Paul Stephen Benjamin, focused on the politics of aesthetics, (mis) representation, and cultural assumption. Words and images, unhinged from their initial context and meaning, were re-mixed into critical confrontations that called into question our historical perceptions of ourselves and others. Benjamin used language and visuals to interrogate long established cultural narratives, and their casual acceptance by and effect on the American public.

“Come Over” is an invitation to closely look at black: the color, the people, and by his own merit, the culture of blackness. Through centuries of oppression, the black body has been left abused by the system, engendering feelings of inadequacy in the collective psyche. Benjamin’s work is an affirmation, a piecing together of the broken and bruised body to be made beautiful again.” –

About the Artist

Paul Stephen Benjamin received his BA from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and his MFA from Georgia State University. Benjamin is a recipient of the 2014 Artadia Award. Recently, he was featured in the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center exhibition “Coloring” and is currently on view at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta–his work titled “Black is the Color” is on view on the contemporary art floor.

He was also featured in the group exhibition Emerging Artist Award Winners 15th Year Retrospective Exhibition at The Swan Coach House. Among his awards to date are the Winnie B. Chandler Fellowship, Diasporal Rhythms Artists Recognition Award, Hambidge Fellowship, The Atlanta Contemporary Art Center Studio Program and the Forward Arts Emerging Artists Award.

Reviews: 

BURNAWAY: http://burnaway.org/review/studies-in-blackness-paul-stephen-benjamin-at-high-gallery/ 

CREATIVE LOAFING: http://clatl.com/freshloaf/archives/2016/02/23/paul-stephen-benjamin-explores-the-color-black

ARTSATL: http://www.artsatl.com/2016/03/review-paul-stephen-benjamins-come-over/

 

Images/Video of the Come Over Exhibition

 

 

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The 2019 Atlanta Jazz Festival

May 25- May 26, 2019, Piedmont Park (map)

Additional Jazz Fest Programs & 31 Days of Jazz

31 Days of Jazz

Prior to the Jazz Festival in Piedmont Park on May 25-26, 2019, the Atlanta Jazz Festival partners with venues all over the city to promote jazz events for thirty-one (31) consecutive days leading up to the main event occurring Memorial Day weekend in Piedmont Park. From MARTA stations, museums, jazz clubs, and restaurants, the 31 Days of Jazz series provides a little something for everyone.

Full lineup of our “31 Days of Jazz” events can be found here.

Neighborhood Jazz Series

The Neighborhood Jazz Series takes place at various City of Atlanta parks on select Saturdays and Sundays throughout the month of May leading up to the annual Atlanta Jazz Festival. Each concert is hosted by a different City of Atlanta Council member, family friendly. and FREE to the public.

Full lineup of our Neighborhood Jazz Series concerts can be found here.

VIP Experience

Each year, jazz festival attendees can upgrade their festival experience and enjoy premium seating and food from some of the city’s finest restaurants.

Learn more about this year’s VIP Experience by clicking here.

Late Night Jazz Jam

The Late Night Jazz Jam is an intimate and smooth evening with some of Atlanta’s finest jazz musicians. This ode to Atlanta’s classic jazz clubs mixes a bit of contemporary flair and excitement into an elegant evening of velvet-wrapped vibes.

Purchase your tickets to this Atlanta classic here.

Sponsors/Funding

The Atlanta Jazz Festival, Incorporated , a 501(c)(3), supports AJF programming through donations and the support of its members, the 35 for 35 Society, a philanthropic group comprised of individuals dedicated to the preservation of jazz.

Sponsors: To find out how your company or organization can be featured at the festival contact Jihan Ali at [email protected].

FY20 Panelist Info and Application

The Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs (OCA) is seeking art leaders and professionals, as well as business and community members who are interested in serving on grant advisory panels for the 2019 Contracts for Arts Services (CAS) program. CAS awards contracts related to the production, creation, presentation, exhibition, and management of artistic and cultural services in the city of Atlanta. The program recognizes that the presence of artists and non-profit organizations involved in the arts are critical to Atlanta’s cultural vitality. CAS grants both general operating and project support to nonprofit 501(c) (3) organizations, NPUs, neighborhood associations and individual artists based in the City of Atlanta corporate city limits. Panelists play a vital role in reviewing grant applications to assist the OCA in granting public funding to the arts. The upcoming panel meetings take place this spring to review grant applications.

Click here to download the FY20 Panelist Guidelines.

Click here to complete the FY20Panelist Application.

*Please email your resume to Monica Prothro – [email protected]

PATTERNS OF FLIGHT: #ARTOFCOMMUNITY EXHIBITION

download

November 19, 2015 – January 20, 2016

About:

Gallery 72 hosted the annual exhibition for The Creatives Project 2015 Resident Artists. A vital force in Atlanta’s arts community, The Creatives Project strengthens and unites arts, education, community and commerce by creating an arts eco-system that empowers eager citizens to recognize Atlanta’s potential. They accomplish this goal by engaging fresh resources, implementing crucial and deliberate arts and culture initiatives and leading arts-based education. TCP patrons donate subsidized housing and free studio space to support our artists as they serve Atlanta neighborhoods by generating vibrant and fertile communities poised for economic growth and development. Inspired by their growth in creative collaboration, the show embodied the journey of the Creatives Project resident artists and how they have expanded and elevated their bodies of work.

Resident Artists: Namwon Choi, Molly Rose Freeman, Angus Galloway, Jason Kofke, Nick Madden, Megan Mosholder, and Spencer Murrill.

IMAGES FROM THE EXHIBITION

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20151120_111804 20151124_120025 20151124_120048 20151124_120256 Angus Galloway TCP Artist Talk A 1-29-2016 Jason Kofke installation Jason Kofke TCP Artist Talk C 1-29-2016

Spencer Murrill TCP Opening reception

ELEVATE 2015: (F)OREVER (I) (L)OVE (A)TLANTA: The ART of ORGANIZED NOIZE

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October 15, 2015 – November 12, 2015

When Rico Wade, Ray Murray and Pat “Sleepy” Brown formed Organized Noize in the early 1990s, hip-hop was in the midst of a vicious (and ultimately fatal) bi-coastal turf war.  While historically polarized between (North) East Coast rap artists and West Coast rap artists, Organized Noize completely changed the direction of hip-hop culture, its sounds and expression.

This exhibition traced the legacy of Organized Noize and their Dungeon Family Collective (which includes Outkast, Goodie Mob, Joi, Slimm Cutta Calhoun, Big Rube and more) from their dirt-floor basements to stages around the world. The exhibition featured archival items from Organized Noize and the Dungeon Family including photographs, artwork, studio equipment, notebooks, costumes and more.

This exhibition was a part of the ELEVATE 2015 Program. For more information, please visit our ELEVATE page.

Exhibition Press/Reviews

Creative Loafing

Rolling Out

Georgia State University: African American Studies

Ray Cornelius Blog

Tuc Magazine

Southern Spaces

 

IMAGES FROM THE EXHIBITION

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Freedom Expressions: Atl II Ghost Slavery Art Against Human Trafficking

Exhibit Opening

September/October 2015

This exhibition was a revised re-mounting of the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport exhibition, “Freedom Expressions Atl.” It showcased artists’ works that focuses on the issue of human trafficking, acting as a call to action to raise awareness to modern day human trafficking and slavery.

“Human trafficking is one of the greatest human rights crises, yet many don’t know about the magnitude of the problem or their personal connection to the issue,” said Deborah Richardson, Interim CEO of The National Center for Civil and Human Rights. “Researchers estimate that that there are between 21 and 36 million people in the world today living as slaves – it is our obligation to be informed and take action on the issue.”

Human trafficking is the fastest-growing criminal industry worldwide. Men, women, and children are being lured into forced labor camps and sexual exploitation, making them victims of human trafficking. Through economic coercion, psychological coercion, and physical coercion, predators have created a shadow economy culture that uses instruments of exploitation designed to keep workers in a perpetual state of indentured servitude and contemporary slavery. Although international trafficking garners much of the headlines, many U.S. born individuals are also the victims of trafficking syndicates that seek to exploit men, women, and children for national and regional labor and sex industry clients. The title of the exhibition, “Ghost Slavery,” speaks to the sad reality that many who are the victims of trafficking in Atlanta, and other cities of the world, often suffer in the plain view of a public who cannot perceive their status or refuses to recognize their existence.

Additional Programming:

Human Trafficking Public Forum and Film Screening:  “Interstate 20” by Marjé Etheridge

Thursday, September 17

Artists Talk and Open Mic for Human Rights -Thursday, October 1

Film Screening: Made in Europe by Inan Telmukuran -Thursday, October 8

 

IMAGES FROM THE EXHIBITION

 

20151002_161441 20151002_161524 20151002_161346 2 INSTALLATION SHOT FEATURING WORK OF JUDY KIRPICH-NAJEE DORSEY- CHARMAINE MINNIEFIELD Kay Chernush- The Game-The Track The Life STARS AND STRIFE by Charmaine Minniefield TRACY MURRELL Over 300,000 Children ... WP_20151006_042 Brikena  Boci Installation Anonime Series 20151002_161409

Richard DuCree: I Bear Witness, Politics and Protest

RICHARD ALLEN DUCREE BLACK LIVES MATTER PROTEST NYC 2014 PHOTO 1

July- Sept 2015

For this exhibition photographer Richard Allen DuCree selected a body of work acting as a visual bridge between generations engaged in movements for social justice. Invoking the memories of past struggles and accomplishments while firmly committing his eye to the unrest and civil rights issues of our contemporary culture, DuCree showed us all the face of our ongoing reach for peace, justice and true democracy. This visual retrospective encouraged an investigation into modern American practices and its relationship to its peoples.

The exhibit contrasted several historic events, individual and moments in time which reflects where we are as nation.  The exhibit featured photographs of historic iconic individuals of the Civil Rights Movement (CT Vivian, dick Gregory, John Lewis, etc), president Obama’s Historic campaign, musicians (Nas), and Travon Martin Black Lives Matter Protest.

 

About the Artist

Richard Allen DuCree is a photographer, architect and artist whose work has focused on social, political, spiritual and historical content. DuCree has found a passion of blending all three disciplines in his work as an artist. His style and method as a photographer is unique in that he approaches his subject as a photojournalist….”telling the story…. capturing a moment in time…..place and evoking a spiritual emotion”. Travel throughout the United States, Caribbean, Europe to Africa has given DuCree a unique global perspective. DuCree’s interests have broadened in recent years to include documenting the environment and the human condition. His most recent works includes an investigation into the Modern Civil Right’s Movement.  “ I Bear Witness” is a visual retrospective which encourages an investigation into modern history.

 

DuCree received a BFA in Design and African American Studies from the University of Massachusetts/ Amherst and his Master’s of Architecture from Georgia Institute of Technology. He has been a lecturer and Adjunct Professor in the School of Architecture at Georgia Tech. He has taught architectural design studios focusing on architectural problem solving with a focus of designing within the urban fabric of Atlanta. This included challenging his students to address and investigate social, economic and cultural issues.

 

 

His work has been featured in many publications including Martin Luther King JR., A King Family Tribute (Abrams, 2012),“ Stop Motion-Nelson Mandela.” ICG vol. 85 no. 02 (2014), “Never Forget – Sarah Jones.” ICG vol. 85 no. 11, “Dream Fulfilled- MLK.” ICG vol. 82 vol. Also, he has worked as a stills photographer for ESPN, CNN, SONY, AMC, NBC and many other national and international networks.

History of Gallery 72

OVERVIEW

Atlanta has historically provided municipal exhibition spaces presenting the work of local, national, and internally acclaimed artists. Previous to Gallery 72’s inception, works were exhibited at City Gallery East (at now Ponce City Market) and and New Visions Gallery. In 2014, the City opened Gallery 72, a fresh new addition to the lineage of Atlanta municipal galleries. Located in downtown Atlanta on the first floor of 72 Marietta Street, Gallery 72 exhibits cutting edge exhibitions and programming relevant to the arts, culture, and people of the City of Atlanta. The City of Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs is proud to continue the commitment of presenting artwork in public spaces, free to the public, with the newest municipal gallery space, Gallery 72. Since its opening in 2014, Gallery 72 has hosted a variety of riveting exhibitions addressing relevant topics such as human trafficking, civil and human rights, memory and ritual,the growth of local arts organizations (including Wonderroot, the Creatives Project, etc), and the rise of hip-hop. For more information about past exhibitions, please visit the “past exhibitions” page.

Exterior Today

Exterior Today

Contact

For more information regarding the exhibitions, events, or the Gallery 72 space, please contact Gallery Coordinator Kevin Sipp: 

[email protected]

404-546-3220

Current Exhibition

On View Now

“Away from the Noise/Welcome to Atlanta” by artists Carolyn Carr and Michael Gibson.

African Jazz #10 ©1990 Michael A. Cummings Artist Collection, 1990 72×108 cotton blends, cotton fabric

In honor of  Jazz Appreciation Month, The Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs and the Atlanta Jazz Festival are pleased to present the exhibition of “The African Jazz Quilts of Michael A. Cummings” at Gallery 72.

 The exhibition opens to the public on Thursday, April 18 and runs until Thursday, June 6, 2019. An opening reception for the installation will be hosted at Gallery 72 on Thursday, April 18, starting at 6 p.m.

Michael A. Cummings, a native of Los Angeles, is a world-renowned quilt maker. Cummings uses reclaimed fabric to create new art and narratives that evoke engagement from its viewers. He has had solo exhibitions with Bates College in Maine, Hallmark Cards, New York City’s Cinque Gallery and Studio Museum in Harlem, among others.

Concerning the quilts of Mr. Cummings, Michael James, Professor of Textiles, Merchandising and Fashion Design at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln says “Michael Cummings has been working with the quilt form since the early 1980s. Cummings has successfully synthesized aesthetic qualities found in folk art, in African and African American art, in music (specifically, jazz), and in diverse textile and non-textile narrative traditions, to arrive at a unique and sincere expression… He’s committed to telling the stories of African-Americans across a broad historical, social, cultural, philosophical, and mythological spectrum”.

Gallery 72 is located at 72 Marietta Street NW, Atlanta GA, 30303 and is open Monday through Friday from 10 am to 5 pm.

 

 

NEARBY PARKING FOR GALLERY 72:

104 Marietta Street Parking Garage (176 feet NW), 79 Marietta Street Parking Garage (245 feet NE) Centennial Tower Parking Garage (332 feet NE), Paid street parking is available near the gallery.

NEARBY MARTA RAIL STATIONS:

Take the Gold line to Five Points Station. Exit the station on the Forsyth Street side and turn right, walk northeast on Forsyth Street, and turn left on Marietta Street. Walk one block to Fairlie Street. After crossing Fairlie Street the gallery will be on the left.

ELEVATE 2012

October 19-27, 2012

 

ELEVATE 2012 opened with a vivacious block party on South Broad Street.  View Creative Loafing’s Photo Gallery of the Opening Block Party here: http://clatl.com/atlanta/elevate-block-party/Slideshow?oid=6776588

2012 ART 

South Broad St. Mural Paintings

ELEVATE 2012 brought four of the world’s most interesting street artists from around the world to Atlanta to create mural paintings on four South Broad Street building facades. These murals are still up on South Broad!

       Artists were:

SEVER

SEVER

Born

Born- Atlanta, GA

Push

Push- Los Angeles, CA

HENSE

HENSE- Atlanta, GA

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TILT- Toulouse, France

Other ART Projects Included:

Roni Nicole, Lillian Blades, Linda Costa, Banho De Luz- “Banho De Luz”- Carnegie Education Pavilion

Mixed Media installation and interactive video event featuring the art of Lillian Blades, Linda Costa, and Roni Nicole Henderson.  A historical monument of the City of Atlanta located at John Portman Boulevard and Peachtree Street, the Carnegie Education Pavilion was the site for an ambitious interactive ELEVATE project. A quilt like drapery by Lillian Blades, laden with LED lights enclosed the existing structure transforming the pavilion into a softly glowing public space. Passerbys were invited into the monument where they become the subject of an art- piece by photographer Linda Costa, best known for light painting and long exposure artworks. Photographs were then projected for public viewing in real time within the plaza area by video artist Roni – Nicole.

Pierre Rigal Dance, Toulouse France

Jessica Caldas, Avien Reese, Back on My Feet

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Randy Walker, Colorfalls Woodruff Park Fountain

Woodruff Park Fountain, a landmark of downtown scenery, was the site of a subtle installation by Minnesota artist Randy Walker. The installation piece subtly integrates colored fibers behind the water fall feature on the fountain. This artwork examines the impact of even a slight creative transformation to heighten the public’s awareness of their environment.

Adrian Barzaga, Save it or Pave it

Located at 143 Alabama street, this five story building, once serving as a thriving hub of activity for the Atlanta Constitution may potentially be removed upon the construction of Atlanta’s new Metro Modal Passenger Transport. Numerous activist groups are currently working to save and memorialize this building advocating for the structure’s importance and historical significance. Through this minimal contemporary facade design, the artist looks to illustrate the nervous human-like energy within the building as it currently knows not what the future holds in store.

 

2013 EVENTS

The Imaginary Million- The artwork of 100 artists was on display at the 200 Peachtree Street Atrium. During the evening, each of the 100 artists bid on the work of his peers with $10,000 in “play” money. At the end of the night, artists took home the work they won, and no real money was exchanged.

 

See another promo video for ELEVATE 2012 here:

Elevate 2013

“TRANSIT: TIME, PEOPLE & PLACES”

October 18-26, 2013

The 2013 Elevate program focused on the intersection of transit, people, and place. Over the past decade, there has been extensive transit growth in Atlanta. The downtown StreetCar, the Beltline, and public transportation are improving walkability, bikability and our city’s accessibility. Elevate 2013 artist installations and performances explored different spaces of downtown Atlanta including the 5 points MARTA train station and South Broad St, and how they relate to this transit growth. Artists provided unique experiences for visitors regarding the space of downtown Atlanta, and left unique marks on the spaces, places, and time.  Please read photo captions below for more information about the events. 

2013 ELEVATE ART

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Sheila Pree Bright- 1960 Who? This installation entitled, 1960 Who? was inspired by the Civil Rights Movement, and featured a series of large scaled portraits of Civil Right activists. WonderRoot and artist William Shweigert also hosted a series of public performances to complement the installations and provide context to the images. Schweigert re-imagined sit in scenes located in downtown Atlanta, and the speech given by Lonnie King addressinng the NAACP through audio and image. Wonderroot created a pamphlet on the historical material, as well as a QR code to hear the audio.

 

 

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Beth Malone-  Y’all Gotta See This- Neon Installations

7 Stages Theater – Mass Transit Muse by Mike Molina Atlanta based theatrical artist, Mike Molina alongside Seven Stages Theater, leveraged three MARTA stations (Inman Park, Georgia State University and Five Points) to conduct a dramatic multimedia performance to illustrate the importance of public transportation and public art. Viewers rode along the train to see each act. The artist’s goal iwas to “encourage transit riders to recognize ‘the other’ in themselves, and themselves in ‘the other’ by using storytelling and performance to create a safe space for people to think more deeply about everyday interactions on public transit.

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Sarah Emerson- tLost and Found A continuation of the South Broad Mural Project (begun in 2012). Emerson’s mural comments on the growth and potential of the street due to the impact of the artwork from 2012.

Lostintheletters – If Heaven by Theroun Patterson. Elevate presented a site-specific performance by local playwright, Theroun Patterson, based on the phrase “y’all gotta see this” (referencing Beth Malone’s neon installation. The performance took place in front of Beth Malone’s neon facade installation.

Cooperatzia by G. Bistaki- Cooperatzia was written and performed by 5 members of the G. Bistaki company. The show played with the form, weight, texture and color of objects that seem ordinary (roof tiles and purses) exploiting the relationship between body-object-space. The path was a theatrical route around the roof of Five Points Marta station.

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Manifeste Dance Performance- A performance by France-based dance group using large scale visual projection and audio. After a two week workshop with Core Dance in Atlanta, the group danced in front of a projection of Toulouse, France on the facade of the Rialto Theatre, transporting viewers to the group’s hometown for a lively dance performance.

Usula Kendall Johnson and Three Dancers converged with Giwayen Mata Elephant Women, 20 female African drummers, to show us how Atlanta has preserved these impactful forms of expression steeped in African heritage.

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Counterpoint Studio Window Installation- Stepping Out Atlanta 

Internationally recognized dance troupes RemoteKontrol and DragonHouse Hail from Atlanta came together to perform, lead by sounds of progressive DJs Genesis and Speakerfoxx.

Panel

Panel Discussion on transit moderated by journalist Tom Sabulis. The panel discussed ways that arts and culture are considered through planning and development for transportation growth in Atlanta. Those involved learned about the progress of ATL transportation with regard to art, community, and accessibility. Panelists were Keith Parker, CEO of MARTA; Paul Morris, President/CEO of the Atlanta Beltline; Tom Weyandt, Senior Transportation Policy Adviser to Mayor Reed; Rebecca Serna, Atlanta Bicycle Coalition; and Cain Williamson, Principle Planner at Atlanta Regional Commission Transportation Division.

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Atlanta Bicycle Tours of Elevate Projects

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STREET MUSEUM- Tina Dunkley toured groups of visitors around her created, outdoor exhibit featuring ten artworks from the Clark Atlanta Museum. Much of the art spoke to the History of Atlanta, where we’ve come from and where we are now.

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Beth Malone “Y’all Gotta See This”

 

 

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Block Party Crowd

Past ELEVATE Programs

For more information about past ELEVATE programs, visit the pages below: 

ELEVATE 2011 – Art Above Underground

ELEVATE 2012 – South Broad Mural Project

ELEVATE 2013 – Transit: Time, People, & Places

ELEVATE 2014 – Social City

ELEVATE 2015 – F(orever) I L(ove) A(tl) – F.I.L.A.

ELEVATE 2016 – Summer

ELEVATE 2016 – Microcosm

ELEVATE 2017 – Enlighten

 

ELEVATE 2014

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“Social City”

October 17th – 23rd, 2014

Elevate 2014, themed “Social City” focused on the physical environment with regard to social interconnectedness and social impact within a city. How do we communicate with each other and how do we interact with our surroundings? What is the social makeup of our city? How does it compare with other cities? How does this benefit the landscape, economic growth and retention and the impact of events and cultural offerings when the social quality of the city is higher or lower?

Artworks, performances, and panels contemplated how a city’s perceptions are altered based on the intersection of art, architecture, design, and communication. Elevate offered creative platforms for socializing and interconnectedness through the arts, emphasizing social media and digital presence.

2014 EVENTS

Downtown Opening Block Party

Downtown Opening Block Party: Performances and installations by the WolfPack, Branden Collins, Eyedrum, Mammal Gallery, the Goat Farm, and DJ Wally Sparks.

Grand Opening at Gallery 72

Grand Opening at Gallery 72- Installations and live performances by Atlanta-based artist, Branden Collins. Digital sculptures and installations by Joanie Lemercier, in conjunction with the French Consulate of Atlanta and France Atlanta.

Not Pictured:

Social City Panel Discussion: Discussions surrounding social interconnectedness, community development, art, and urban growth. Presentations and Conversations led  by Tim Crimmins and Danielle Roney.

Special dance performance by Association Manifeste  following “Social City” discussions.

Atlanta Streets Alive Art Bike Tour of Elevate public artworks located on buildings, alleyways and parks of Downtown Atlanta.

Woodruff Park: French Film in the park; Eight short comedic films by Max Linder

Performance by Makeshift Circus

Lunchtime Artist Talk: Lemercier discussed his unique, light-based projection art located in Gallery 72 and 55 Marietta Street combining math with art and immersing the viewer in a journey that conjures space exploration.

5 Points MARTA Amphitheater: Fun-Size Fringe: Atlanta Fringe Festival favorites Sith Penguin, Thimblerig Circus, and Twinhead Theatre presented exciting aerial dance and acrobatics, circus, and comedy acts. Learn more about Atlanta Fringe at www.atlantafringe.org.

2014 ART

WELOVEATL

Joe Dreher

Evereman

Eyedrum

Red Ball

Romy Maloon– “Calibrate”- A 20’ floral sculpture

Casey Lynch- “Headphones”

Manifeste

Entertainment by Miguel Atwood-Ferguson Quarteto

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Branden Collins at Gallery 72

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Goat Farm D_UMPSTERs Project

10 Atlanta artists were given big metal trash receptacles—as the title would suggest—to create a work of public art.

Click artists name for an image of each Dumpster project Second Story, the Young Never Sleep, Kris Pilcher, Relay TeamMarcus Kenney, Kevin Byrd & Mary Grace Phillips, Igor Kursunskiy, David Baerwalde & Alex Martinez, Mike Black, Dustin Chambers, Chamber Cartel.

Click here to view a blog on the D_UMPSTERS project 

Click here to hear a WABE feature on the D_UMPSTERS project

Rue Des Dames La Passant

La Passant

Dance Truck Performance

Dance Truck Performance- Fairlie + Walton: the Dance Truck commissioned an armful of talented choreographers and dancers to produce a night of performances to close out the Elevate week. Elevate participants also had the opportunity to dance in the dance truck! Click here to view a gallery of this performance: http://dancetruck.org/Elevate-2014

Tesselate by Joanie Lemercier

Tesselate by Joanie Lemercier- Collaboration with France Atlanta and The French Consulate of Atlanta, Joanie Lemercier’s Tesselated Atlanta light- design and sculpture, a public art performance

Performance by Brandon Collins

Street Performance by Branden Collins

Living room by Mammal Gallery

Living room by Mammal Gallery

 

 

 

 







 

 

Residency or Headquarter Eligibility

City of Atlanta Planning Viewer Interactive Map 

Individual and organization applicants can click here to enter their address in the tool/search bar at the top left corner of the page and determine their residency or headquarter eligibility.

The purpose of this web map is to provide geographic information central to helping the OCA determine if an applicant lives within the City of Atlanta corporate city limits. It can be used for simple tasks such as determining the zoning districts in which a neighborhood lies, or for more complex tasks such as analyzing recent development patterns. In short, it is intended to help you–whether as a planner, community leader, or citizen–to make more informed decisions.

NAG Guidelines & Application

Neighborhood Arts Grants FY20 Deadline Extended: Friday, May 3, 2019 – 5:00 p.m. (Only accepting HARD COPY applications).

The Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs is pleased to continue the Neighborhood Arts Grants program designed to encourage artistic development, engage neighborhood arts-making and reimagine places. The OCA piloted this funding program in early 2015 to help neighborhood associations and neighborhood planning units (NPUs) enrich the quality of life in the City of Atlanta. We will begin accepting applications in HARD COPY from March 1 until May 1, 2019.

 


Download FY20 Neighborhood Arts Grants guidelines here.

Download the FY20 Neighborhood Arts Grants application here.

Download the FY20 Neighborhood Arts Grants budget form here.

Please reference the instructions for completing an application.


Neighborhood Planning Units (NPU)

Locating a NPU: NPUs are Citizen Advisory Councils that make recommendations to the Mayor and city council on zoning and land use. You can find your neighborhood by looking at an alphabetical list of neighborhoods that shows which NPU each neighborhood belongs to or by looking at an alphabetical list of NPUs and the neighborhoods they contain.

Neighborhood Associations

Locating a Neighborhood Association: Neighborhood Associations consist of neighborhood residents who volunteer in the beautification, historical preservation, and celebration of the uniqueness of their neighborhood. Review the alphabetical list of neighborhood associations.


For more Contracts for Arts Services information, please contact:


 

 

HISTORY of ELEVATE

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Launched in 2011, the first exhibition of ELEVATE hosted 15 events and 40 performances over 66 days. Artwork filled vacant properties, street corners and plazas to showcase artwork ranging from 13 story murals to contemporary dance, video, installation and poetry. Although public funding allocated through our percent for art program was the direct source for the artist commissions, additional funding to execute an exhibition of this caliber was provided through local Atlanta businesses. Donation of art space, hotel rooms, theatrical lighting, food, advertising and cash support nearly doubled the exhibitions initial budget, demonstrating the immediate community support. This intensive cultural programming brought in 13,313 new visitors to downtown Atlanta.

At the end of the program, downtown property owners and businesses adopted the bulk of the visual work commissioned through ELEVATE. The artwork has now been incorporated into the permanent downtown landscape. In addition to the adopted artwork, other aesthetic improvements to the downtown district were implemented surrounding the close of ELEVATE. Underground Atlanta was publicly earmarked for a potential art space by Atlanta Mayor, Kasim Reed.

Elevate strives to build bridges in the downtown community though partnerships and collaboration. The total amount of partnerships formed in ELEVATE 2011 was 19, including Universities, not for profit organizations, government organizations and private businesses. Within one month following the close of Elevate 2011, 101 local, national and international articles were published regarding downtown Atlanta, the arts and most importantly their relationship to the businesses and surrounding economy.

ELEVATE officially became an annual downtown arts program of the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs in 2012. Now in the sixth year, the physical project area has been extended from coverage of three blocks to all of central downtown Atlanta.  We expect ELEVATE 2016 programs and commissions to impact the Atlanta economy, increase the quality of life for our citizens, educate the public and gain global attention for our city as a creative and culturally engaging contemporary city.

ELEVATE 2015

logo

Forever I Love Atlanta (F.I.L.A)”

October 15th – 23rd

Operating under the theme F(orever) I L(ove) A(tl) – F.I.L.A., The goal of ELEVATE 2015 was to generate a heightened sense of pride in the city of Atlanta and what it offers to the nation and the world. ELEVATE 2015 produced a 9-day celebration of what makes Atlanta unique and special through visual art, performances, and events that showcase Atlanta – past, present, and future.

Inspired by its rise from the ashes of Sherman’s war campaign, Atlanta is represented by the phoenix. Today, she continues to reinvent herself. ELEVATE 2015 was a celebration of Atlanta, where she’s been, where she is now and where she is going!

The curator for ELEVATE 2015 was visual/performing artist and scholar Fahamu Pecou.

2015 EVENTS

Evening Opening Block Party- Hosted by Emporer Searcy and featuring performances and installations by DJ Jelly, Speakerfoxx, JIVA, Max Hnery Woo, Bent-Frequency, and Wabi Sabi

Evening Opening Block Party- Hosted by Emporer Searcy and featuring performances and installations by DJ Jelly, Speakerfoxx, JIVA, Max Hnery Woo, Bent-Frequency, and Wabi Sabi

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PANEL DISCUSSION- Art of Organized Noize Rico Wade, Ray Murray and Pat “Sleepy” Brown discuss the origins and impact their work has had on hip hop culture in Atlanta, the South and globally.

bridging the gap

Bridging the Gap Panel Discussion- Moderated by Burnaway’s Stephanie Cash- Gallery 72 – Auditorium Atlanta’s arts institutions are critical to the overall cultural landscape. However in a city that’s constantly changing in tastes, styles and even geographically, determining the most effective means of engagement can be a challenge. This was a talk with representatives from Atlanta’s premiere institutions in a conversation about engagement, outreach, programming and more.

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ELEVATE 2015 Curator Tour Woodruff Park- Curator Fahamu Pecou provided a guided tour of ELEVATE “Forever I Love Atlanta (FILA)”

Not Pictured:

LiFT Art Salon

Hosted by Nasim Mahboubi Fluker and Clint Fluker, LiFT Art Salon is a monthly gathering of young professionals, artists and social activists. The organization is aimed to foster dialogue and inspire creative solutions to the problems that face society and Atlanta’s broader community. For ELEVATE 2015, LiFT’s monthly salon took place in the Gallery 72 auditorium, transforming the page into a gathering for local emerging visual artists, musicians and social entrepreneurs to build community, share ideas and learn about innovative projects in and around the city.

http://southernspaces.org/2015/lift-art-salon-gallery-72

Raising the Temperature with New Arts Organizations Panel Discussion -Moderated by Bem Joiner

Atlanta’s contemporary arts scene is thriving and this is partially due to the spirit of innovation evidenced by the explosion of new arts organizations, collectives, institutions and funding sources. This panel allowed the public to hear from some of these new organizations and learn about their programs, their vision and why they believe Atlanta is the ‘Silicon Valley’ of creative start-ups.

interSessions: The Artx Hip Hop Dialogues- The Rialto Center for the Arts at Georgia State University

interSessions™- a series of curated conversations between notable figures from the arts community and the hip-hop community mediated by artist Fahamu Pecou. The series was dedicated to interrogating art and hip-hop not as isolated encounters, but rather where they intersect, how they complement and enhance each other, and, ultimately, how in conversation they act to transgress the status quo.

2015 ART INSTALLATIONS

When Rico Wade, Ray Murray and Pat “Sleepy” Brown formed Organized Noize in the early 1990s, hip-hop was in the midst of a vicious (and ultimately fatal) bi-coastal turf war.  While historically polarized between (North) East Coast rap artists and West Coast rap artists, Organized Noize completely changed the direction of hip-hop culture, its sounds and expression. This exhibition traced the legacy of Organized Noize and their Dungeon Family Collective (which includes Outkast, Goodie Mob, Joi, Slimm Cutta Calhoun, Big Rube and more) from their dirt-floor basements to stages around the world. The exhibition featured archival items from Organized Noize and the Dungeon Family including photographs, artwork, studio equipment, notebooks, costumes and more.

The Art of Organized Noize Exhibition at Gallery 72: When Rico Wade, Ray Murray and Pat “Sleepy” Brown formed Organized Noize in the early 1990s, hip-hop was in the midst of a vicious (and ultimately fatal) bi-coastal turf war.  While historically polarized between (North) East Coast rap artists and West Coast rap artists, Organized Noize completely changed the direction of hip-hop culture, its sounds and expression. This exhibition traced the legacy of Organized Noize and their Dungeon Family Collective (which includes Outkast, Goodie Mob, Joi, Slimm Cutta Calhoun, Big Rube and more) from their dirt-floor basements to stages around the world. The exhibition featured archival items from Organized Noize and the Dungeon Family including photographs, artwork, studio equipment, notebooks, costumes and more.

Balmori Associates- Meditation Room: Reflecting on the Horizon

Balmori Associates- Meditation Room: Reflecting on the Horizon.

Chris Chambers- Untitled Arc

Chris Chambers- Untitled Arc

Rachel Garceau- In the Light

Rachel Garceau- In the Light

Jason Kofke- Caveat Emptor

Jason Kofke- Caveat Emptor

Lumumba Mogerie- Through Neon Lights

Lumumba Mogerie- Through Neon Lights

Vek Neal- Pop Up Photography

Vek Neal- Pop Up Photography

Sanithna Phansavanh– Growth

Sanithna Phansavanh– Growth

Joseph Dreher- #WeLoveAtl

Joseph Dreher- #WeLoveAtl

Bent Frequency- Music for a Captive Audience

Bent Frequency- Music for a Captive Audience- This exhibit turned the newest downtown feature, The Atlanta Streetcar, into Atlanta’s first mobile performance venue. For 14 hours during ELEVATE 2015, musicians from Atlanta’s premiere contemporary music ensemble Bent Frequency occupied the street cars to give free concerts to riders for the duration of the loop route. These performances offered visitors, concertgoers and adventure seekers a unique sonic landscape.

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Rising Consciousness – by Lionel Daniels- Local painter, Lionel Daniels live art performance painting historical images of Atlanta on canvas in Woodruff Park.

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Dance City Melting Pot – by Max Henry Woo Members of the Atlanta Dance World, Zulu Nation, and Jungle Boogie crew collaborated and battled against each other in a series of performances showcasing the history and culture of Atlanta’s original and adopted Hip-Hop dance styles.

T. Lang Dance

T. Lang Dance- LIT: Variation #10- LIT explored the ritual movement of a ring shout re-imagined for the 21st century, performed by professional Atlanta-based dance artists and pre-professional dancers studying at Spelman college. The work spoke to the anticipation of reunification and uncertainty if prayers will be answered.

                                                                                                                                              MORE ELEVATE 2015 IMAGES       

 

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Public Art Collection Map

2018-2019 Grantees

Major Arts Organization

Art Organizations

Community Cultural Development

Artist Project

(more…)

2015-2016 Grade Level Experiences

 

Pre-K  Children’s Museum

Kindergarten  Atlanta Botanical Garden

1st Grade  High Museum

2nd Grade  Atlanta Ballet

3rd Grade  Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum

3rd Grade Chick-Fil-A Home Office Backstage Tour

4th Grade  Atlanta Symphony Orchestra

5th Grade  Atlanta History Center

6th Grade  Alliance Theatre

7th Grade Arts Bridge

8th Grade Center for Civil and Human Rights

High School 1  Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum

High School 2  Atlanta Opera

High School 3  David J. Sencer CDC Museum

High School 4  Center for Civil and Human Rights

High School 5  Georgia Tech Office of Arts

High School 6  Museum of Design Atlanta

High School 7  Rialto Center for the Arts

High School 8  True Colors Theatre Company

High School 9  Oakland Cemetery

High School 10  Atlanta Shakespeare Company

Resources for Grant Seekers

Here are a few resources to consider:

The Georgia Center for Nonprofits

www.gcn.org

The Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta

www.cfgreateratlanta.org

The Foundation Center of Atlanta

foundationcenter.org/atlanta

Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System

www.afpls.org/books-materials/grant-resources

Tips for Individual Artists Writing a Compelling Grant Application

JG_TIPS AND TRICKS FOR WRITING A COMPELLING GRANT APPLICATION

 

Gallery 72

Atlanta is quickly gaining acclaim for its cutting-edge exhibitions, quality contemporary art, and progressive arts scene. Our Downtown art gallery, Gallery 72, has a strong focus on local talent and serves as an institution that supports individual artists, local galleries, arts organizations, and curators.

Location: 72 Marietta St. NW, Atlanta GA 30303

Hours: 10am- 5pm, M-F

Lunchtime Gallery Tours: GALLERY 72 lunchtime tours will take place from 1pm to 1:45pm every Tuesday and Thursday except during gallery installations. Please contact the Gallery 72 office for more information: 404-546-3220.

Click here to find out more about Gallery 72’s current and upcoming exhibitions.

2014-2015 Grade Level Experiences

 

Pre-K  Children’s Museum

Kindergarten  Atlanta Botanical Garden

1st Grade  Atlanta Symphony Orchestra 

2nd Grade  Atlanta Ballet

3rd Grade  Chattahoochee Nature Center

4th Grade  Ballethnic Dance Company

5th Grade  Atlanta Cyclorama and Civil War Museum

6th Grade  Alliance Theatre

7th Grade  High Museum of Art

8th Grade  Atlanta History Center

High School  1   Rialto Center for the Arts

High School  2   The Atlanta Opera

High School  3  Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center

High School 4   National Center for Civil and Human Rights

High School  5   Theatrical Outfit

High School  6   Museum of Design Atlanta

High School  7   David J. Sencer CDC Museum

High School  8   True Colors Theatre Company

Gallery 72

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ABOUT

Gallery 72 is a municipally owned art gallery located in the heart of downtown Atlanta. The Gallery is located in the lobby of City owned 72 Marietta street building. It is free and open to the public to access. The gallery was opened in 2014, and has since focused on serving local talent including individual artists, local galleries, arts organizations, and curators.  The Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs is proud to host a contemporary art gallery which adds to the growing and progressive arts scene of Atlanta.

Location  

 

Address: 72 Marietta Street, Atlanta GA 30303

Hours: 10am- 5pm, M-F

Gallery Tours: GALLERY 72 tours take place from 1pm to 1:45pm every Tuesday and Thursday. To schedule a tour, please contact the Gallery 72 office:  404-546-3220// [email protected].

Mission & Programs

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About                                                                                                                                                    The Office of Cultural Affairs Public Art Program (OCA/PAP) is charged with administering the development and management of public art projects for Atlanta City Government. OCA/PAP also provides programs and services that support our arts community while improving the quality of life for all citizens and visitors. The Public Art Program is the sole caretaker of the Public Art Collection for the City of Atlanta; this includes oversight, maintenance, and exhibition of 127 public sculptures and monuments, which are valued at over $22 million. In addition, the PAP Public Art Program oversees the curation and exhibition of 226 artworks including paintings, photography and sculpture within the “Portable Collection.”

Mission
The Office of Cultural Affairs Public Art Program operates on the premise that art enhances the quality of life for our citizens by encouraging a heightened sense of place, increasing our community’s prestige and enlivening the visual quality of Atlanta’s built environment. The program promotes a public initiative of outreach and education while working to preserve the city’s cultural heritage.

The OCA/PAP is committed to creating community through public art and builds upon community support to conserve, preserve and make available public art to citizens and visitors in Atlanta.

History
In 1977, Atlanta, in stride with many other major metropolitan cities, adopted its first public art ordinance which set aside a percent of capital improvement funds for the development of public art.

See most recent Atlanta’s Percent for Art Ordinance here.

In addition to the Percent for Art Ordinance, in 1994 the then Bureau of Cultural Affairs (BCA), along with concerned citizens, initiated a planning process for the development of a Public Art Master Plan. Working with it’s advisors, the BCA developed an initial plan that guided Atlanta through the 1996 Olympic Games and the installation of a number of new projects. In 1999, a task force was convened to review and update the Public Art Master Plan (PAMP) and a revised PAMP was adopted by the City in 2001.

In the News

“AN – Cultural Experience Project“, City of Atlanta – Channel 26, September 18, 2014

Cultural Experience Project – Full Story“, WAOK – AM Erica Walker, September 11, 2014

A Visit with Camille Russell Love – Cultural Affairs “, GNN Radio Network, September 4, 2014

The Cultural Experience Project” , CBS Atlanta “Better Mornings”, September 10, 2014

“City Cafe on Cultural Experience Project’s 10th Year”,  WABE-FM “City Café”, September 10, 2014

Cultural Experience Project offers free field trips to APS students“, Atlanta INtown, October 2013

People 2 People”,  WSB-TV (ABC), September 27, 2013

City of Atlanta Recognized Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. as Atlanta’s first BCA 10: Best Businesses Partnering with the Arts in America honoree“, Press Release, City of Atlanta, September 18, 2013

Cultural Experience Project Kicks-off with APS and Partners“, Talk Up APS, September 12, 2013

“Cultural program is a trip for Atlanta students”, Atlanta Journal Constitution, September 10, 2013

ARTSpeak: Lena Carstens on the Cultural Experience Project“, Burnaway Magazine, September 10, 2013

Cultural Experience Project” City of Atlanta Channel 26, September 2013

Cultural Experience Project” Class Notes, WXIA Channel 11, September 2013

 

2013-2014 Grade Level Experiences

 

Pre-K  ImagineIt! The Children’s Museum, High Museum of Art

Kindergarten  Atlanta Botanical Garden

1st Grade  Atlanta Symphony Orchestra

2nd Grade  Atlanta Ballet

3rd Grade  Chattahoochee Nature Center

4th Grade  Ballethnic Dance Company

5th Grade  Atlanta Cyclorama

6th Grade  Alliance Theatre

7th Grade  Michael C. Carlos Museum

8th Grade  Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre

9th Grade  High Museum of Art

10th Grade  Georgia Shakespeare

11th Grade  The Atlanta Opera

12th Grade  Rialto Center for the Arts

ELEVATE

Hosted annually by the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs in various locations around Atlanta, ELEVATE is a temporary public art program that seeks to invigorate the Atlanta area through visual art, performances, and cultural events. The focus of ELEVATE is to enhance the city’s cultural offerings by providing free, quality cultural experiences that highlight what makes Atlanta unique and increasing Atlanta’s cultural and economic vitality.

Each October, ELEVATE is presented with a specially curated “theme” that emphasizes various artistic elements and features local, national and/or international art and artists strategically presented to capture the interest and imagination of viewers, while providing an entirely new and accessible experience for Atlantans.

Since its inaugural year in 2011, more than 250 articles have been published regarding the new cultural vitality of the city. The project has ignited conversations regarding the importance of cultural districts in City Planning and Urban Design Departments as well as the City Council and surrounding communities.

In addition, many of the temporary projects created through the festival still exist today in their site-specific areas. ELEVATE was placed in the top 50 public art projects in the Nation by Americans for the Arts Public Art Network,” as well as the top 10 projects for City Livability.

For more information on past ELEVATE events and programming, visit the official ELEVATE website at www.elevateatlart.com and follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

The Public Art Collection

The Public Art Program is tasked with the maintenance and conservation of the City of Atlanta Public Art Collection, which includes 139 public artworks valued at over $22 million. The Collection, featuring historically significant artworks by local, regional, and nationally acclaimed artists depicts artworks that are in the care of the City of Atlanta’s Public Art Program.

To browse the full collection online, click here. To find out where these artworks and monuments are located, visit the Google Map, or download the Mobile App (search Public Art Tour on Android and Mac Stores).

Collection Management

The Office of Cultural Affairs Public Art Program (OCA/PAP) Collections Management Team conducts annual assessments of each artwork in the collection and prioritizes maintenance and conservation efforts.

To encourage community support of public art, The Adopt-An-Artwork program allows for concerned citizens, neighborhood organizations, companies and corporations to actively participate in the preservation of the public art collection by partnering with the OCA/PAP to provide the necessary resources to maintain the artworks in their neighborhoods and communities. Taking a proactive stance in managing and preserving the growing collection of public art in Atlanta ensures that historically significant artworks remain for future generations to experience.

Ten Featured Artworks

Browse below a selection of key artworks within the Atlanta Public Art Collection, identified by  Robert Witherspoon, Public Art Manager.

Isamu Noguchi – Playscapes

Thornton Dial – The Bridge

Sol Le Witt – Wall Drawing #581

Curtis Patterson – Andrew Young Tribute Plaza

Alexander Doyle – Henry W. Grady

Jim Siegler (designer) & Gamba Quirino –  Atlanta From the Ashes (Phoenix Rising)

David Hammonds – Nelson Mandela Must Be Free to Lead His People and South Africa to Peace and Prosperity

Elizabeth Catlett – People of Atlanta

George Beasley – Five Points Monument

Xavier Campaney Medina – Homage to King

 

 

Artist Registry

The Public Art Atlanta National Registry serves as a preferred vendor list for commissioning artists for public art projects and direct purchases of artwork for the City of Atlanta.  Currently the Registry shows full portfolios and resumes of over 300 professional public artists.

The Office of Cultural Affairs Public Art Program presents the Registry to project managers and communities for their consideration in upcoming commissions, invitations and direct purchases. Other commissioning agencies and private companies within Atlanta are encouraged to consult the registry as well.

To view the full Artist Registry online, click here.

Public Art Policies

Public Art Permits

Temporary Art Permit Application (for City Parks)

Please contact Project Coordinator, Briana X. Camelo with any questions regarding these processes.

[email protected]; 404-546-6980

Public Art Plans/Ordinances

Public Art Master Plan

Percent for Art Ordinance

Atlanta’s Public Art Gift Policy

Internships

The OCA Public Art Program offers internships to qualified applicants to work on various projects throughout the year. This is a unique opportunity to gain valuable knowledge of the public art process, artwork installation and upkeep, design, marketing, research and communication.  Ideal candidates should have a strong interest in public art administration, a strong academic record, and an interest in learning how the arts support and contribute to the development of the greater community.

INTERNSHIP GUIDELINES

  • Internships are unpaid, unless otherwise noted and course credit is available.
  • Internships vary in length from 8-13 weeks.  Availability and length of opportunity is based on department needs.
  • Students must be enrolled in an accredited college or university.
  • Students must have reliable transportation (public transit is considered a reliable source), be prompt, responsible and dependable.

If you are interested in learning more about our internship opportunities, please complete this form, attach a current CV or resume, email to Briana Camelo at [email protected]

Public Art Tours

Guided Tours

The City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs Public Art Program is proud to host guided public art tours in Downtown Atlanta. Guides will lead you through Downtown Atlanta corridors and touch on historical sites and monuments that speak to the heart of Atlanta’s character. This Public Art Tour is a great way to learn about Atlanta’s place in history through our cultural and artistic lineage. Tour includes 15 Public Artworks and lasts approximately 120 minutes. Reservations required with a minimum of 10 people.

To schedule a guided Public Art Tour, contact:

[email protected]

 

Self-Guided Tours

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Mobile App: OCA’s Public Art Tour mobile app, launched in January 2015, allows users experience the vibrant history of Atlanta’s Public Art collection through the use of a mobile device. The app features tours mapped out along the Atlanta Streetcar, Downtown Atlanta, and and art in our parks. The easy to navigate app uses GPS to pinpoint the user’s location and provides in-depth text and audio pertaining to each unique piece.

How to Download: Search “Atlanta Public Art Tour” in the app stores of Mac and Android.

Audio Tour: The Public Art Program also offers the use of telephone audio tours. To listen, simply call the phone number (404) 260-5532 and follow the prompts.

Download the audio tour map for use with the telephone audio.

Public Art

2011-2012 Grade Level Experiences

 

Pre-K  ImagineIt! The Children’s Museum

Kindergarten  Atlanta Botanical Garden

1st Grade  Center for Puppetry Arts

2nd Grade  Atlanta Ballet

3rd Grade  Chattahoochee Nature Center

4th Grade  Atlanta Symphony Orchestra

5th Grade  Atlanta Cyclorama

6th Grade  Alliance Theatre

7th Grade  Michael C. Carlos Museum

8th Grade  Ballethnic Dance Company

9th Grade  High Museum of Art

10th Grade  Jimmy Carter Presidential Library & Museum

11th Grade  High Museum of Art

12th Grade  Rialto Center for the Arts

2012-2013 Grade Level Experiences

 

Pre-K  ImagineIt! The Children’s Museum

Kindergarten  Atlanta Botanical Garden

1st Grade  Atlanta Symphony Orchestra / Alliance Theatre / Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre

2nd Grade  Atlanta Ballet

3rd Grade  Chattahoochee Nature Center

4th Grade  Ballethnic Dance Company

5th Grade  Atlanta Cyclorama

6th Grade  Alliance Theatre / Theatrical Outfit

7th Grade  Michael C. Carlos Museum

8th Grade  Theater of the Stars

9th Grade  High Museum of Art

10th Grade  Georgia Shakespeare

11th Grade  The Atlanta Opera

12th Grade  Rialto Center for the Arts

The Cultural Experience Project was launched during the 2005-2006 school year to afford every Atlanta Public School (APS) student from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade the opportunity to experience the city’s premier art and cultural venues. The City of Atlanta’s vision is for every student in APS to have minimally one onsite cultural experience at a cultural venue each year that directly ties to Common Core Georgia Performance Standards and curriculum goals. Teacher and student educational materials further the students understanding of arts and culture and compliment the age and grade level-appropriate experiences.

The idea is, “one grade, one venue, guaranteed”. Art or cultural venues agreed to provide a cultural experience for each APS grade level. The City of Atlanta envisions the opportunity for every student to experience the wealth of Atlanta’s cultural venues at no cost to the student.

The purpose and learning outcomes of the initiative are:

 

Atlanta Jazz Festival

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Please note the official Atlanta Jazz Festival website may be accessed here.

ABOUT

The Atlanta Jazz Festival (AJF) is regarded as one of the largest FREE jazz festivals in the country. An annual celebration of the music, culture and art of jazz begins in April and culminates each Memorial Day weekend, with an outdoor festival in Atlanta’s Piedmont Park, featuring jazz artists from all over the world.

The mission of the AJF is to expose and entertain a diverse audience of Jazz aficionados, young Jazz enthusiasts and aspiring musicians to the rich heritage and variety of Jazz as an authentic form of American music.

The AJF is produced by the City of Atlanta – Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs. It is FREE and open to the public. The AJF is funded through the support of corporate sponsorships as well as Atlanta Jazz Festival, Inc., a non-profit entity dedicated to preserving the legacy of the Atlanta Jazz Festival.

CAS Guidelines & Applications

 

Major Arts Organizations Grant

The FY20 Deadline Extended: Friday, May 3, 2019 – 11:59 p.m. (Only accepting ONLINE applications).

Download FY20 Major Arts Organizations Grant guidelines here.

Please reference the instructions for completing an online application.

 

Arts Organizations Grant

The FY20 Deadline Extended: Friday, May 3, 2019 – 11:59 p.m. (Only accepting ONLINE applications).

Download FY20 Arts Organizations Grant guidelines here.

Please reference the instructions for completing an online application.

 

Community Cultural Development Organizations Grant

The FY20 Deadline Extended: Friday, May 3, 2019 – 11:59 p.m. (Only accepting ONLINE applications).

Download FY20 Community Cultural Development Organizations Grant guidelines here.

Please reference the instructions for completing an online application.

 

Artist Projects Grant & Emerging Artist Award

The FY20 Deadline Extended: Friday, May 3, 2019  – 11:59 p.m. (Only accepting ONLINE applications).

Download FY20 Artist Projects Grant & Emerging Artist Award guidelines here.

Please reference the instructions for completing an online application.

 

FY20 Panelist Information and Application

The FY20 Deadline: Friday, May 10, 2019 

Click here to download the FY20 Panelist Guidelines.

Click here to complete the FY20 Panelist Application.

*Please email your resume to Monica Prothro – [email protected]

 

Funding

Funding Philosophy

The Office of Cultural Affairs (OCA) believes that providing the local arts community with financial assistance is an investment in the continued cultural growth of the city of Atlanta. At the same time, the Office recognizes that government resources are limited while demands for services are high. For this reason, the Office views its financial assistance role as that of a catalyst, helping to augment and strengthen a grantee’s overall base of support. All funded activities must take place within the city of Atlanta and result in presentations available to the general public.

Funding Categories

Who We Fund

*Refer to the Application Guidelines for Eligibility Requirements for a specific funding category.

Who We Do Not Fund

What We Fund

What We Do Not Fund

Application Workshops

Each year, the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs conducts application workshops for Contracts for Arts Services applicants. First time applicants for the 2019-2020 funding cycle are required to attend an application workshop. Workshops will provide an overview of the program, application tips and the review process.

Contracts for Arts Services

The Contracts for Arts Services (CAS) program is the City of Atlanta’s means of granting public funding to the arts.  CAS awards contracts related to the production, creation, presentation, exhibition and management of artistic and cultural services in the city of Atlanta. The program recognizes that the presence of artists and non-profit organizations involved in the arts are critical to Atlanta’s cultural vitality. The arts enrich the creative development of the city’s diverse populations and contribute positively to the social and economic well being of Atlanta and the region. The goals of the CAS program are:

Each year, CAS awards grants in the following categories:

The CAS program also provides matching support for projects posted on http://www2.power2give.org/curator/city-of-atlanta-office-of-cultural-affairs , a crowd funding site for the arts, designed specifically to connect donors to projects that inspire them. In 2015, the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs is piloting a new Neighborhood Arts Grants program designed to bring arts into the community.  Please see the Guidelines & Applications section to download the application.